PERSONAL

ECQ Season 2 in the Philippines

ECQ Season 2

A year ago, when the ECQ Season 1 was announced, we were all hopeful that one day, this pandemic would end. However, it’s been a year, it just got worst.

Yes, there are vaccines, but there are also new strains.

Yes, there are strict protocols like curfew and new ECQ stuff, but there’s no mass testing.

Yes, there are vaccines, but our LGU is still out of reach.

Honestly, I’ve become more anxious because I live with a senior citizen. That worries me more than my own health. Our house is an open door. Literally.

How am I coping?

First, I rest. I have decided to do nothing at certain days. Sometimes, I feel overwhelmed with tons of adjustments and works. Hence, I feel stressed! Anyways, I still find time to work on my pendings. Chill, self.

Second, I rearrange my room every two weeks or whenever I feel to rearrange it. There’s a time when I decided to rearrange it just because I want to and I feel bored.

Third, I journal. I have started writing random stuff without being obligated to post it online. I have kept all those thoughts in my cutie notebook. That sparks joy. Writing just for myself.

Fourth, I try to read books during my free time. Really. I have convinced myself not to buy books unless I have finished reading all my new ones.

Lastly, I try to be spiritually healthy by listening to online retreats, reading daily gospel, attending weekly Bible sharing, and listening to Mass.

Just random thoughts as a writer/MA student/employee/eldest Asian daughter.

You see, being an artist in this time of pandemic is definitely challenging. People expect you or you expect to write more just because you are at home. I set expectations to myself as well to write more and to be more productive just how I do it before pandemic.

I would not want to use pandemic as an excuse but it seems like to be a valid excuse. (Ang gulo ko. Sorry) Basically, I am thriving to be that ‘ideal’ writer who still contributes something to the art world. Chz.

Anyways, this is just an update post about how am I dealing with life lately.

How are you, folks? I hope you are all well and healthy.

Follow me on Twitter! @kimderla Instagram @kim.derla

TEACH

How to Give Talk or Webinar Online

Aside from being missing in action for four months, I am just your average elementary teacher teaching English to grade one students in a private school in Pasig. So, whenever somebody asks me to give a talk about a certain topic, I honestly do not know how to react. What I do is I absorb the info about the invitation, weigh whether I can commit myself fully to it or not for a few minutes. If everything is good, (if I am mentally okay, and our internet permits), I say say.

2020 has brought lots of opportunities for me. Not posting this to brag but to give you some details on how to deal with invitations for speakership.

How to Give Talk or Webinar Online

Here is what I have learned after saying YES to 10 events this year.

  1. When somebody invites you for a talk, ask them the important details.
    1. objectives
    2. target audience
    3. date and time
    4. means of the seminar (online or face-to-face)
    5. length of your talk
    6. of course, the program.

You need to know these details so you can easily create an outline for your talk that would address what your audience needs. You need these details, promise. I’ve learned this the hard way. There was a time when I absent-mindedly say yes to a friend, not reading the objectives of the workshop I was assigned to. (Sorry, friend, if you are reading this.) Good thing, I was able to adjust the flow of my talk and my activities for that day.

2. Prepare ahead of time. I believe, you are given enough time to prepare for your talk. Hence, you should read, draft, and write your talk in advance. Avoid cramming.

3. Create a strong visual or Powerpoint presentation. Make sure that it follows the usual rules for presentation like the font size (big enough), font style (not more than three font styles), and even the layout. Yes, Canva has a lot of templates, but make sure to make necessary adjustments so you won’t appear the typical Canva user. hehe.

4. Make your online talk or webinar interactive. Let your audience feel that they are part of the program and not just passive listeners. They can contribute to the discussion by commenting their insights or by simply asking questions. Let them know that you are monitoring their comments in the comment section or chat box. Haha. That gives them the sense of responsibility and urgency to respond to your questions.

5. Integrating games to your talk or webinar sounds exciting! When they know that they will be rewarded, audience tend to be more motivated to participate. Most of the time, games add flavor to one’s talk, as well.

These are just some of the things I did before I give talk or webinars online. If I’ve missed anything, feel free to comment them in the comment section below.

Have a great day ahead!

-Kim

LIFE LESSONS

What 2020 has taught me

I really find it hard to write a yearend essay for 2020. Since the quarantine has started, I spent most of my time at home. I work from home, I stare from my home, and I even accomplish my hobbies (which I usually do at the coffee shops) at home.

But if there are important lessons I’ve learned in 2020, these are the following:

  1. Invest in a good home. Good home does not really mean a grand structure or house. It simply means building stronger relationship with your family. In my case, I am privileged enough to have a good relationship with my family. I thank God for this privilege. It was not that hard to stay at home for almost a year.
  2. There are things that we can live without. I have more than three pairs of shoes, and during the quarantine, I’ve realized that having a good pair of functional and sturdy shoes is enough. Also, I’ve learned to live without milk teas, pricey coffee, and luxurious stuff (wehh) bought from the malls. I’ve learned to appreciate the essential things that I already have.
  3. I have learned to appreciate silence and solitude. I’ve busied myself with so much work, and other extra-curricular activities, not thinking that rest is important. During the quarantine, I’ve rested and learned new skills and discovered some hobbies. Haha.
  4. Speaking of hobbies, I’ve learned to cook, draw, and play mobile games! This, I must say, is an achievement because I’ve never intended to do any of these before.
  5. Transition is important. From the usual face-to-face classes, to online classes. From the usual seminar for teachers to online webinars. I thank the Lord for giving me the means to cope with these life transition.
  6. We can always help in your own little ways. Despite of the nationwide economical crisis, my church mates, friends, and I were able to reach out to our local communities. We were able to do an outreach for them. Also, we were able to give Christmas goods and gifts for the needy. Thank God, for the grace!
  7. Financial literacy is important. Being financial literate is helpful. We will never know when will pandemic end. Hence, we must be ready emotionally, physically, and financially.

Whoever is reading this right now, may you feel recharged enough to start another year. 2020 has been so challenging. But once we’ve hoped for greater things, better days will surely happen.

What is the most important lesson that 2020 has taught you?

LIFE LESSONS

Third Space

Have you heard of the term third space?

When you go out of your house, you bring your own baggage. Then, as you proceed with your journey, you carry that baggage with you. Once you meet and interact people, you’d know they too have their own baggage.

Now, when you entertain someone, you are slowly introducing your baggage to him/her. Later on, you’ll show him/her what is inside your baggage.You’ll show him/her your childhood memory. You’ll explain your happiest moment out of that baggage. You will also show him/her the different compartments that your baggage has. You will tell him/her why those compartments exist. You will gladly tell him/her that those spaces are made for permanent people in your life.

As you speak with that person, he/she will also show you the kind of baggage that he has. He/She will open up that baggage for you. Maybe, his/her baggage has different content from yours. You may find it unique or weird. That depends to your upbringing or opinion? Not sure. Still, as that person opens up his/her baggage with/for you, you slowly realize that person must have travelled miles to see you and show you what he has. Both of you decide to journey together. You carry your own baggages. You share your unique experiences.

Later on, you’ll realize that you need a space where you can place the baggage that you both have. Now, you ended up looking for a shared space where you can both put your baggages together. That’s the third space. You see. Your baggage maybe smaller than his. Maybe, his baggage requires more from your third space. That’s when you compromise.

Your third space is where you and your special someone (or maybe a group of people) meet in between. Third space is where understanding (supposedly) and commonality should meet.

Again, you have different baggages, exposure to society, upbringing, views, and perception about life. Those differences meet at your third space.

Question. How is your third space? Not only with a certain person, but with your friends, family, and colleagues?

How is your third space?

Do you consider your third space peaceful?

Do you consider your third space genuine?

Do you consider your third space lacking?

You and the people around you has their own made-up third spaces. Every single day is an opportunity to make that third space worth sharing. Now, are you willing to share your third space?

PS. Post is inspired by Angela Esmeralda’s Podcast: Pa-relevant. It is on Spotify. Super relevant. Please search. Good day ahead, folks!

ART

When you buy art from artists, you are not just buying their products/services. You support their hardwork.

When you buy art from artists, you are not just buying their products/services.

You support their humble beginnings. Becoming an artist is not something a person can do overnight. It’s not magic, nor there is any secret formula on becoming one. Sleepless nights, newbie-feels in the field, and uncertainties are always present.

When you buy art from artists, you support the way they cope with tons of rejections. You support how they stood up and got back to the track. Crafting an art is not easy. It includes series of setbacks and failures. Still, artists thrive despite their personal issues in life.

When you buy art from artists, you support how they’ve honed their craft. You support their studies about it. You support their research on making their craft better. You push them for their betterment. You also support how they present their final outputs.

When you buy art from artists, you are subconsciously telling them to continue creating. You give them the means and the encouragement to keep on doing what the world needs. Art may not feed your physical body, but it is something that feeds your soul.

Again, when you buy art from artists, you are urging them to make this world a better place despite of all the mess present in life.

To the artists reading this, padayon!

To our supporters, salamat!